This 4-Year-Old Girl Pulled Off A Physical Feat Most Adults Can’t Even Imagine

People say you can achieve whatever you put your mind to. While this might be true, most people don’t have the willpower or determination to accomplish huge feats because let’s be honest: a lot of folks would rather sit on a couch watching television and eating potato chips than spend time working towards something epic.

Maebh Nesbitt, however, is not one of those lazy types. She loves the outdoors, and her parents instilled an adventurous spirit in her. That’s how, by the time she was five, she pulled off one incredible feat that even most adults couldn’t manage!

Maebh Nesbitt isn’t your average kid. She’s accomplished a heck of a lot more in the five years she’s been on the planet than most adults. She loves the outdoors, and thanks to her parents, she’s earned some serious accolades.

Her mother, Siobhan, and father, Lee, are obsessed with all things outdoors. They spend as much of their time as possible taking in nature and exploring new land. Rain or shine, winter or summer, it doesn’t matter. They love every second of it.

It’s not a new passion of theirs, either. One of the main reasons they clicked was their mutual love of nature and hiking. Even when Siobhan was pregnant, the outdoor excursions didn’t stop.

In fact, her pregnancy gave her motivation to keep up with the physical activity. She hoped when she finally gave birth, she and Lee could bring their little one on adventures with them. Sure enough, after her daughter Maebh arrived, it happened.

Obviously, Siobhan and Lee didn’t hike anything strenuous with Maebh; they didn’t dare put their child in any kind of danger. But, they did want to acclimate her to the great outdoors. Sure enough, as she got older, she craved the adventures.

As soon as she could walk by herself, Maebh would lead the charge through the wilderness of upstate New York, where there were plenty of small trails to start on. Her passion for hiking only grew stronger.

As she got older, she grew more daring. Her parents monitored her carefully as she traversed rocky terrain, but she seemed to have a knack for it. They both couldn’t believe how she took to climbing just like they did.

Not only did Maebh love to spend her time outdoors, she chose to hike over any other activity. While most kids her age wanted to play video games or watch television, she opted to walk trails and scale rocks.

By the time Maebh was four, she completed more trails in the Adirondack Mountains than most adult hikers. The more she hiked, the more a certain sticker on Siobhan’s stood out to her. It had a special meaning.

See, Siobhan was part of the 46ers Club, a group of hikers that scaled all 46 peaks of the Adirondack Mountains. When Maebh noticed a sticker her mother had on a water bottle for the 46ers Club, she knew she wanted one, too.

Ascending all 46 peaks was no easy task, but with parents like Siobhan and Lee, it was possible for Maebh. Sure, Siobhan could have gotten away with giving her daughter a sticker regardless, but she wanted her daughter to work towards the goal.

So, Maebh began her literal trek towards the coveted 46ers Club. She’d already dominated many of the trails with her parents, but there were still more to tackle. Siobhan and Lee were right there by her side as she worked her way towards victory.

The final climb was the most daunting — the 5,344-foot Mount Marcy. Though the ascent wasn’t for the faint of heart, having two experienced hikers like Siobhan and Lee with her helped push Maebh towards the top.

With some moral (and physical) support from her parents, she made the climb! She was now the youngest person ever to become part of the 46ers Club, and she want even five years old yet!

Maebh’s parents could not have been prouder of their little girl. They never once pushed her into a hiking and outdoors lifestyle — it was a passion she developed on her own. Not only was she as dedicated as them, but now she had the awards to prove it.

When Siobhan finally handed her daughter the 46er Club sticker, she was elated. “It brings tears to my eyes,” she said. “I’m so proud of her accomplishment, it started out as my little dream. My dream became hers, and she did it.”

Now, every time Maebh went to the Adirondack Festival with her parents, she could proudly display her sticker to the other hikers in attendance. Not everyone could boast about the same accomplishment, and Maebh took so much pride in that.

It was such an amazing feat that the family was actually featured on an episode of Good Morning America where they discussed Maebh’s dedication to the goal. Maebh even encouraged kids to get out and hike. “It’s so much fun!” she exclaimed.

More and more kids are tapping into their senses of adventure and doing what was never thought possible. In fact, Maebh might’ve gotten an extra dose of inspiration from the incredible accomplishments of a girl named Winter…

There are plenty of athletic kids out there, but Winter Vinecki was something special. While all of her friends were playing inside, Winter was out on her bike or on foot, training for her next big race.

Team Winter / Facebook

By the age of five, Winter was already competing in adult marathons, and by nine she was ready to test her limits in her first Olympic-distance race. Many believed that Winter was too young to compete — until she finished the marathon in just four hours.

Staying healthy and pushing herself past her limits were always the driving factors behind Winter’s desire to compete, and through her success she hoped to inspire other kids to do the same. But all that changed in 2009 when tragedy befell Winter and her family.

Just ten short months after his diagnosis, Winter’s father, Michael, passed away from prostate cancer. Winter was heartbroken over the loss of her father, but instead of letting her sadness consume her she decided to transform her grief into something truly incredible.

ESPN

With the help of her family, the young runner founded Team Winter, a non-profit dedicated to raising funds for prostate cancer research and awareness. She began actively touring the U.S. on behalf of this mission, speaking in front of large crowds in memory of her father.

Winter Vinecki

Winter even worked to promote her foundation while training and competing in her races. Rain or shine, she could be always found at her Team Winter booth before every marathon, promoting her cause as furiously as she raced.

Winter Vinecki

As the years went on, Winter found great success in both of these areas of her life, becoming a back-to-back IronKids National Triathlon champion in 2010 and 2011 and raising over $400k toward prostate cancer research. Yet even with so much accomplished, Winter was still dreaming bigger.

In early 2012, Winter decided to honor her father’s memory in the only way she knew how — by running. And it wouldn’t be just one marathon: it’d be seven — one on every continent on Earth!

Park Record

The prospect of running a full marathon on all seven continents was surely a difficult one, and even some of the world’s most experienced runners wouldn’t dare perform such a feat. But with Michael’s memory fueling her, Winter was confident she would succeed — and do it all before her 15th birthday.

ESPN

“My goal is to be the youngest person in the world to complete a marathon on every continent before I turn 15, to honor not only my dad but the one in six men affected by prostate cancer,” Winter told CNN.

Winter Vinecki

And so, in April 2012, Winter took the first step on her seven-continent journey by competing in Oregon’s Eugene Marathon. She placed fourth in her age group with a time of 3:45:04, which would stand as her fastest marathon time to date.

Team Winter / Facebook

Next came Africa, where she participated in the Amazing Maasai Marathon in Kenya, just miles from Lake Victoria. And while Winter had run on treacherous terrain before, she admitted to needing a little extra encouragement in order to conquer the hilly landscape.

Team Winter / Facebook

“One of my favorite memories from Kenya was when I was running up the steepest hill and these two little boys, maybe around 6 years old, started running beside me,” Winter told Statesman Journal. “It was that extra motivation I needed to get up the hill and finish the race.”

Team Winter / Facebook

Winter went on to place third in the marathon, though she had little time to rest before the third leg of her journey. Sure, the transition from Oregon to Kenya was no walk in the park, but no amount of training could truly prepare her for what came next: Antarctica.

Team Winter / Facebook

The 2013 Antarctica Marathon saw Winter run 26.2 miles across the frigid, icy landscape of the Antarctic continent. Even after slipping on a patch of ice, Winter finished third in the women’s competition and became the youngest person to ever complete a marathon on Antarctica.

The Huffington Post

Winter was almost halfway to her goal, but through all the joys and struggles of her mission, she never lost sight of why she was running in the first place. And no matter how far from home her journey took her, she knew that her father was always running beside her.

The Clymb

“The main goal is to take my dad to the places he never got to go and also to spread prostate cancer awareness,” said Winter. “I plan on showing my dad all these amazing places he never got to see. He is with me wherever I go, and you can bet he is by my side every step of the way as I conquer every continent, 26.2 miles at a time.”

Winter Vinecki / Facebook

Next up for Winter was South America’s Inca Trail Marathon, known by many as one of the toughest in the world. The trail – which ends in the legendary lost city of Machu Picchu – typically takes three days to hike. Winter did it in less than one.

Statesman Journal

After navigating a 13,000-foot mountain pass through rain and snow and dodging all manner of local wildlife, Winter finished the race in just 9 hours, placing first overall for the first time on her journey. The win felt good, but Winter knew she couldn’t stop now.

Statesman Journal

A plane ride halfway across the globe set the stage for Winter’s next race, which was the Sunrise to Sunset Marathon in Mongolia. Traversing perilous mountain peaks, dense woodlands, and windswept valleys, Winter finished the marathon in second place.

Statesman Journal

The sixth stop on her journey was Australia, but unfortunately for Winter, there were no marathons being held that allowed a 14-year-old to compete. She looked to New Zealand for a remedy, and after running in the Wharf to Wharf marathon, she officially checked Oceania off her list.

Team Winter / Facebook

By this time, the months of nonstop travel and training began to take a toll on Winter’s physical and mental health. But with her goal of completing a marathon on every continent just within reach, Winter wasn’t ready to give up.

Team Winter / Facebook

“The travel has been the hardest thing and that makes the whole thing pretty tiring and hard to keep up with the training but I can’t complain, it has been an incredible journey,” Winter told NZ Herald. “It will be a surreal feeling when it is all over with my last marathon in Athens.”

Team Winter / Facebook

At last, in November 2013, Winter arrived in Athens to compete in her final race, the Athens Classic Marathon. The tour traced the original run of Pheidippides, the legendary courier who inspired the concept of the marathon.

Statesman Journal

With a time of 4:03:53, Winter crossed the finish line and officially became the youngest person in the world to complete a marathon on all seven continents. As Winter basked in the pride of her accomplishment, she raised a finger skyward and exclaimed, “this is for you, Dad!”

Statesman Journal

Michael had no doubt been by his daughter’s side throughout her journey, but there was also another that ran beside Winter: her mother. From Oregon to Athens, Winter’s mother, Dawn, had run every single race alongside her, making them the first mother-daughter duo to complete the feat as well.

Statesman Journal

A runner herself, Dawn’s mission was more than just about breaking records: it was about empathizing with her daughter. After all, while Winter may have lost a father, Dawn had lost her husband and best friend.

Statesman Journal

“I also want to show her that I, too, could do anything I put my mind to and that I can be a full-time mom, a full-time dad, a full-time physician and still train and run seven marathons in 18 months at age 45,” Dawn told Yahoo! News.

Outside Online

It was now late 2013, and Winter, having officially completed her goal and taken her place in the record books, was finally free to return to a normal life. But Winter, as we know, was anything but normal, and the end to this adventure opened the door for her to pursue her second passion: aerial skiing.

Winter Vinecki / Facebook

With her childhood spent between Michigan and Oregon, taking up skiing seemed a natural next step for young Winter, who at age four strapped on her first pair of skis. Her time on the slopes was casual at first, but in 2011 she began training professionally after Olympic aerialist Emily Cook encouraged her to do so.

Winter Vinecki

“Skiing is a huge part of our family, and I’ve always had a love for it. I don’t want to get burned out on running and think it’s good to cross train, so when I got the opportunity to do aerial freestyle skiing, I took it,” Winter told Statesman Journal.

Winter Vinecki / Facebook

Amazingly, Winter was as good a skier as she was a runner, and at one point she even qualified for the FIS Junior World Ski Championships and the Sprint Freestyle U.S. Championships. However, the tournaments were scheduled during her marathon tour and she was forced to give up her spots.

Winter Vinecki / Facebook

Now that her seven-continent journey was behind her, Winter set her sights on the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics. And after only a few years spent with the U.S. Freestyle Junior Worlds Team, 19-year-old Winter was named to the U.S. Olympic Ski team. But her Olympic dreams were not to be.

Winter Vinecki / Facebook

During a qualifying run, Winter tore her ACL and was forced to withdraw from PyeongChang. She continues to recover from her injury and hopes to compete in the upcoming 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing.

Winter Vinecki / Facebook

“My timeline has now changed, but my goals have not,” the iron girl wrote in a social media post addressing her injury. “So, it’s not over. Stay tuned and never give in.”

Winter Vinecki / Facebook

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